Archive for March, 2013


SFFS: Snippet #3 from “Acts”

“Words have weight, sound and appearance; it is only by considering these that you can write a sentence that is good to look at and good to listen to.”
-William Somerset Maugham

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Science Fiction & Fantasy Saturday is…a web ring of authors who post snippets of their work for comment. In reality, it’s a close-knit group of friends and colleagues working together to support and encourage one another and promote the science fiction and fantasy genres. I am just one author in the midst of awesome authors. To read other snippets, or learn how to join us, visit scififansat.blogspot.com!

tgpThird week and here’s another snippet from my short story, Acts, published in Villipede Publications‘ sci-fi anthology, The Glass Parachute (available to purchase at Amazon). Click the following links to read the first snippet & and the second snippet.

If you choose not to read the first couple of snippets, Tammi and Westin are equipped with communicators inside their ears, which is how Tammi is able to hear the conversation. And everyone’s social status on Nobile is determined via whatever color band they have embedded beneath their wrist.

Tammi leaned against a wall and watched as Westin pulled out a business flex-card they had printed the day before. “My consort and I would like to submit an objection to the Nobilities Act regarding one of their laws, and we would love to have your support.”

Jasen chuckled. “I’m flattered you believe I have some sort of sway to their opinion, but I’m merely a spokesman. An employed face. I relay their decisions, nothing more. My objection would be just as effective as yours.”

“But you would have a greater impact because you’re an Orange-Blood. You and I don’t intermingle, so if the government sees us together on a subject, they’re sure to notice.”

Tammi listened with eagerness as her consort wove the web of stories to her ex-lover.

I hope you enjoyed this snippet! And be sure to check out other snippets by the other authors at scififansat.blogspot.com.

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“The real writer is one who really writes.”
Marge Piercy

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March 18, 2013
Skipping Stones
by Devin Miller (his blog)
Mr. Miller has had over a dozen of his stories published, but this is his first professional sale, so a congratulations goes out to him! It’s quite a feat and a wonderful feeling. Onto the story, I didn’t care for it the first read-through. The second time, I realized how touching of a story it actually is. It’s about a people who skip from planet to planet because years ago they had to leave their home world due to its impending death. However, as families merge, there are some people in the older generation who have to remain on whatever planet their pod brought them. It is a short story, but Mr. Miller could expand this idea if he desired to. Worth reading! You can read Skipping Stones here.

March 19, 2013
The Tying of Tongues
by Kristi DeMeester
Before I even started reading the story, there’s a disclaimer saying it’s an adult, disturbing, haunting tale. Totally not the type I would typically read, but I thought I’d read it in order to place a review about it. The story is narrated by a girl named Anya and it includes a mysterious, hooded woman who comes into the village, bleeding. It was written well, but it does involve some blatant sexual references and even a rape. Personally, I wouldn’t want to read it again, but I liked the flow of the piece and it had a tone of tragedy underlying its entirety. Skillful writer. You can read The Tying of Tongues here.

March 20, 2013
The Man and the River
by Therese Pieczynski
This was more an allegory or a metaphor than it was a story. It was rather odd, as well. A man who marries a river but fears the alligator inside the river… Quite frankly, to me, it appeared that the author substituted the need to get across the metaphor or “the point” more than telling a story and giving a character that the reader could connect with. You can read The Man and the River here.

March 21, 2013
Shadow Play
by Liz Argall
Wow. You could get really lost in this story. In the “shadow play” if you will. The story focuses around an aged shape-shifter who resorts to the shadow puppet lifestyle, giving shadow plays from a booth in a playhouse theater. It is not often I come across a story that I think is written in the second person well, but Liz Argall did a great job with that. Beyond that, the words she chose to paint the scenes, the characters, the tone… It was enjoyable. Read Shadow Play here.

March 22, 2013
Foundering Fathers
by Brian K. Lowe (his blog)
What a fun ride this story took me on! It begins with Webster and Soames, two guys who are living in the 26th century. Due to a time machine, they find themselves in the year 1775. Exploring the surroundings alone, Webster enters a bar and makes a couple of fast friends named Paul Revere and William Dawes. By the time the three have had multiple drinks, Soames arrives and realizes that this night was April 18, 1775 — the very night Revere and Dawes were supposed to warn their comrades about the coming British troops! Often a good sign when altering history is at stake… Great story! Webster is a good narrator, an amusing character. And you can read Foundering Fathers here.

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SFFS: Snippet #2 from “Acts”

“What a writer brings to any story is an attitude.”
-John Gregory Dunne

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Science Fiction & Fantasy Saturday is…a web ring of authors who post snippets of their work for comment. In reality, it’s a close-knit group of friends and colleagues working together to support and encourage one another and promote the science fiction and fantasy genres. I am just one author in the midst of awesome authors. To read other snippets, or learn how to join us, visit scififansat.blogspot.com!

tgpThis week I am sharing another snippet from my short story, Acts. Acts is published in Villipede Publications‘ sci-fi anthology, The Glass Parachute (available to purchase at Amazon). To read the first snippet, click here.

To help set the scene, as I skipped some paragraphs from the first snippet to this one: On Nobile, the social status is based on whatever color band a Nobilian has showing beneath their wrist. There are seven colors, and those with less desirable colors often refer to those with better social standings as “Upper-Bloods.”

Oh. And if you don’t read the first snippet, Westin and Tammi are talking through communicators affixed inside their ears.

“We’ll be free of these Upper-Bloods and the entire Nobility Act nonsense soon enough,” Westin said.

Tammi stepped carefully down the steps, holding onto the gold-plated hand railing. On her way, she spotted Westin in the crowd. His black, slicked back hair was a standout amongst the array of vibrant hair colors.

Then a freckled face in the crowd drew Tammi’s attention. It was more the length of his bright green hair he wore in a ponytail that made him noticeable. Very few Nobilian men fashioned their hair with length. But it looked good on this gentleman; worked well with his round face.

“Jasen’s coming your way,” she whispered.

“I see him,” Westin said.

I hope you enjoyed this snippet! And be sure to check out other snippets by the other authors at scififansat.blogspot.com.

“The writer’s duty is to keep on writing.”
William Styron

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March 11, 2013
Neighbours
by Rob Butler

The short story, that rests at a little over five hundred words, follows a main character by the name of Tyllaxis. His country has been at war with the fifth planet for centuries, and Tyllaxis’ duties include launching rockets at their enemies on a daily basis. Even though he is unaware of the details that warranted such constant demolition, he does his duties, even as people on his world are dying of a nasty plague. The story may be brief, but it packs a mighty punch in the end! Definitely different and it leaves an impression. And a story that leaves the reader with an impression is a story worth reading. Read Neighbours here.

March 12, 2013
Linger
by Ken Liu (his website)
This story is the sum of a man, a woman, a woman he misses, and an alien race coming to freeze humanity. First and foremost, Ken Liu’s resume speaks for itself. He’s been published in Lightspeed, Asimov’s, Analog, Clarkesworld (plus others), AND he’s won a Nebula award and a Hugo award (and others). Not to mention that he has EIGHT other stories published with Daily Science Fiction. All of that right there is enough to make me want to study his work and see what I can extract and import into my own fiction. Because those markets are markets I have on my list to be published in.

Back to the story… It is written so eloquently, every sentence seemed to have purpose. I will admit the timeframe (Flashback? Not flashback? Memory?) was a little difficult to follow. That said and done, it doesn’t diffuse the fact that Mr. Liu’s flow, pacing, setting, and voice were all amazing. I think the poetic nature of this piece is what makes the story work so well. You can read Linger here.

March 13, 2013
Subject AT-171
by Melissa Mead (her website)
This story is in a series of 14 Twisted Fairy Tales Melissa Mead wrote and that DSF is publishing (at a rate of every other Wednesday). This story takes on Goldilocks and the Three Bears, and it’s a very nice rendition… with a tWiSt. Haha! I thought it was nice. You can read Subject AT-171 here.

March 14, 2013
Jimmy Smith Has a Dinosaur
by Gregg Chamberlain (his Facebook)
From the title and reading the first two lines in the story you’re bound to give a chuckle. Billy is trying to get his mom to give him certain things that a boy named Jimmy Smith has. It’s a nice read. It isn’t an epic story (not even very long) and there really is no wars or bombs or aliens or any epic battle between good and evil. It’s a simple, light, fun story. And we need those sometimes. Kudos, Mr. Chamberlain! Read Jimmy Smith Has a Dinosaur here.

March 15, 2013
Pythian Games
by Tom Doyle (his website)
This story follows Aristonike, a widowed older woman who takes on the role of Pythia — oracle of Delphi. It took me a little bit of time to actually get into the story, but once Aristonike began speaking with the god whose messages she was relaying, I was engaged. The dialogue between Aristonike and the god was witty, charming, and yet had a caring undertone. From what I can tell, Mr. Doyle did excellent research regarding Delphi, the temple of Apollo, Crete, etc. Beyond that, I think Mr. Doyle did a terrific job with Aristonike’s character throughout the story. You can read Pythian Games here.

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